Skip to main content

About your Search

20130106
20130114
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 4
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 8, 2013 5:30pm PST
. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> reporter: math teacher salman khan started providing free online classes in 2010 out of his house, arguing that new approaches to teaching were needed. he inspired stanford professor sebastian thrun and colleague peter novick to put a course on artificial intelligence online just last year. >> and to our surprise 160,000 students signed up. we managed to graduate 23,000 students at stanford graduate- level quality in a specialized subject area called artificial intelligence, which means peter and i taught more students than all thprofessors in the world ombined inhe se subject area. >> reporter: were you amazed by this, or did you expect it? >> i was blown away, and it changed my life. >> reporter: after that success, thrun founded udacity, a fast- growing startup in palo alto, financed with venture capital money, offering classes in science, technology, engin
PBS
Jan 7, 2013 9:00pm PST
of explaining what we can do. then comes a group that we cal thconcned. this is about 29% of the public. these are people that think okay, it's happening, it's human caused, it's serious, but they tend to think of it as distant. distant in time, that the impacts won't be felt for a generation or more and distant in space, that this is about polar bears or maybe small island countries, not the united states, not my state, not my community, not my friends and family or the people and places that i care about. so they believe this is a serious problem, but they don't see it as a priority. then comes a group, about a quarter of the public that we call the cautious. these are people who are kind of still on the fence, they're trying to make up their mind. is it happening, is it not? is it human, is it natural? is it a serious risk or is it kind of overblown? so they're paying attention but really just haven't made up their mind about it yet. they need to be just engaged in some of the basic facts of climate change. then comes a group, about eight percent of the public that we call the diseng
PBS
Jan 11, 2013 11:00pm PST
and struggle of people in trouble and this one was stomach cal and so imagine if it had all of that kind of, you know, social conscience and neorealistic exploration but also this sense of really the only word i have is magic, and it went -- it kind of invented this world and got so wonderfully inside the consciousness of this child, it remind med of the first time i ever read huckleberry finn, just the child's perception assort of wise and also innocent and organizing how the world looks and how it might be and how you want it to be and taking terrible tragedy and deprivation and disaster and turning it into something that was joyful and just it blew my mind, i have seen it a bunch of times and -- it doesn't lose anything. >> rose: how many times. >> four or five. >> can i -- >> on the wild. >> i know there are other critics and viewers who agree with in, i felt all of that trying to happen and trying to do all of that and i admirethe utopian vision that brought it it about and the actors helped build the set and the story creation is great but i found it so shapeless and bludgeoned by the
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)